March kids reads

I am writing this on my walk to the tube station. I have turned into one of those utterly annoying people who write on their phones whilst walking!!! God how vexing! I am ashamed of myself. The sun is shining and I’m not wearing a coat. Spring has definitely sprung. This is my last week of working in the day. From next week until the 13th April I just have shows at night. My last show is a matinee of the Merry Widow on the 13th and then I’m done! The baby isn’t due until the beginning of July but lumbering around being pregnant on stage is pretty rank so I decided to take the time off. One of the things I am most excited about is reading to my girls every night….that and a nightly bath!!!

  • Theodor Seuss Geisel. Born 2nd March 1904.

Dr Seuss is a firm favourite in our house. I am surprised and a little ashamed to say that he is an author who passed me by when I was younger. This month, on my walks to the station, I decided to listen to some podcasts on the authors I’ve read and it turns out that Dr Seuss was a pretty interesting guy. Firstly, we are all saying his name wrong. Apparently the correct pronunciation is Zoice!!! This is totally the kind of stuff I love finding out. From now on, I shall be utterly smug when his name comes up in conversation.

The Cat in the Hat is probably one of his most famous books and was published in 1957. Cat in the Hat was intended as a children’s primer with 225 words. His editor then bet him he couldn’t write a book with 50 words….Green Eggs and Ham was created

I think the best podcast I listened to was called Stuff you Should Know. This is an American podcast and the hour was packed with tons of interesting information about Dr Seuss. In recent years the Read Across America project which has always backed Dr Seuss books decided to move away from promoting the author in favour of more racially diverse books. Apparently, last year, a library refused a gift of Dr Seuss books which were sent by Melania Trump. The library said that the books were “steeped in racist propaganda and harmful stereotypes.” Anne Nealy who is a Professor of Children’s Literature at Vanderbilt Universitu said “Theodor Geisel was a product of his time. We should not judge him by today’s standard but we must evaluate the books that we decide to share with children using today’s standards.” Is this political correctness gone a bit mad??? Whatever your views, I think Anne Nealy hits the nail on the head. As a mother who enjoys reading these books to her children, I would agree that they certainly aren’t racially diverse, however my kids and I enjoy them and they encourage my daughter to read.

  • A Stitch in Time by Penelope Lively.
  • Dame Penelope Lively born 17th March 1933.

Maria is always getting lost in the secret world of her imagination…

A ghostly mystery and winner of the Whitbread Award,republished in the Collins Modern Classics range.

Maria likes to be alone with her thoughts. She talks to animals and objects, and generally prefers them to people. But whilst on holiday she begins to hear things that aren’t there – a swing creaking, a dog barking – and when she sees a Victorian embroidered picture, Maria feels a strange connection with the ten-year-old, Harriet, who stitched it.

But what happened to her? As Maria becomes more lost in Harriet’s world, she grows convinced that something tragic occurred…

Perfect for fans of ghostly mysteries like ‘Tom’s Midnight Garden’.

Last month I attempted to read Milly Molly Mandy to Edie. It was a complete and utter failure. My 5 year old city girl was underwhelmed with quaint country life. She couldn’t believe that Milly Molly Mandy spent her time picking blackberries and running errands. “The most boring book ever” I was told. This got me thinking about how literature has changed. Edie is too young to read A Stitch in Time….the back of the book says it’s recommended for 9 year olds. Having said that, I don’t think she would enjoy it when she gets to 9. I am embarrassed to say that me at 37 found it dull!!!! Looking at reviews on Amazon and Goodreads, the star rating seems high but nearly every review is written by an adult who remembers it from their youth.

A Stitch in Time won the 1976 Children’s Whitbread Award so at the time it was obviously incredibly popular. Undoubtedly, the writing is lovely and the character of Maria is beautifully drawn. I particularly enjoyed Lively’s description of Maria’s parents who were obviously the dullest of the dull. My issue with the book is that nothing really happened. It is slow but I guess that is because in the 70s, the pace of life was slower. Nowadays, we are spoiled by the internet, social media etc. We are used to things happening immediately, at the touch of a button…..you can even turn your house lights on with your mobile phone! I guess we don’t have to work at things as much. This book made me think how much the Harry Potter phenomenon must have changed literature. I’m not saying I need magic and giants but I need SOMETHING and I know my children definitely do.

  • The Sheep Pig by Dick King Smith.
  • Dick King Smith born 27th March 1922.

The Sheep-pig is one of Dick King-Smith’s most famous tales. It shot to further fame when the film adaptation, Babe, was released in 1995. 

‘Why can’t I learn to be a Sheep-Pig?’

When Babe, the little orphaned piglet, is won at a fair by Farmer Hogget, he is adopted by Fly, the kind-hearted sheep-dog. Babe is determined to learn everything he can from Fly. He knows he can’t be a sheep-dog. But maybe, just maybe, he might be a sheep-pig.

‘An unexpectedly thrilling, funny charmer of a book’ – Guardian
‘Dick King-Smith is a huge favourite with children’ – Observer

***Winner of the Guardian Fiction Award***

Dick King-Smith served in the Grenadier Guards during the Second World War, and afterwards spent twenty years as a farmer in Gloucestershire, the country of his birth. Many of his stories are inspired by his farming experiences. He wrote a great number of children’s books, including The Sheep-Pig (winner of the Guardian Award and filmed as Babe), Harry’s Mad, Noah’s Brother, The Queen’s Nose, Martin’s Mice, Ace, The Cuckoo Child and Harriet’s Hare(winner of the Children’s Book Award in 1995). In 2009 he was made an OBE for services to children’s literature. Dick King-Smith died in 2011 at the age of eighty-eight.

Dick King Smith was born on the 27th March 1922 and The Sheep Pig was published in 1983. 🐷🐑🐷🐑🐷🐑🐷🐑🐷🐑🐷🐑 Sadly, I didn’t read any of these books when I was a child so I am really enjoying it now. Edie (6) is also enjoying it although it has thrown up some interesting questions about where we get sausages from. Thankfully, Edie is not in anyway sentimental and sausages remain her food of choice so all is well. 🥓🥩🍖🥩🥓🍖🥩🥓🍖🥩🥓🍖🥩🥓🍖

On Saturday I was feeling particularly lazy and decided to put the film on for the girls. I was fully intending to doze all the way through it but I sat there enraged. Was it the the ludicrous Americanised view of English country life? No, I admit, I quite like the artificial American ideal of hazy sunsets, thatched cottages and picture prefect farms. No, what really got my goat (🐐) were the ridiculous amounts of American accents. If you are making a film based on a British book, set in Britain why not use English accents. Pregnant, hormonal, me???

The Sheep Pig is a really fun book to read aloud and I feel the need to give myself a MASSIVE shout out as my voices are on point. If anyone is looking for someone who can do a great west-country farmer or a ewe with foot-rot then I’m your girl. 🙌👍🙌👍🙌👍🙌👍🙌👍🙌👍🙌👍🙌. In conclusion, great book for for 6-8 year olds. It’s also worth mentioning that in this copy, there were enough illustrations to keep Edie well entertained.

Anyway, have a great month.

Thanks for reading.

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