Children’s reads for February.

Hi all. Spring is in the air and my mood has lifted remarkably. It has been a bit of a slow reading month with the kids as I have been working every night. My husband then takes over reading duty but so far he seems to have read The Dinosaur who Pooped a Planet nearly every night this month. 😳😳😳

  • Milly Molly Mandy by Joyce Lancaster Brisley.
    Joyce Lancaster Brisley born 6th February 1896.

One of the biggest disappointments in the life of a book nerd is when you excitedly introduce your offspring to a book you loved as a child and they describe it as ‘pants.’ This is exactly what happened this month when I embraced the Mary Poppins in me, made hot chocolate with marshmallows and started to read Milly Molly Mandy. I didn’t get far into Milly Molly Mandy buying eggs for Farver and Muvver before Edie declared that this was ‘the most boring and stupid story’ she had ever heard. To be fair, the stories haven’t stood the test of time. As a child raised in the city, Edie has no appreciation of blackberry picking or laundry drying in the country air. She is a child of iPads and trampoline parks. I don’t really know what I was thinking, trying to introduce her to the quaint and charming world of village life. Sadly, the book has been relegated to the top of the shelf, probably never to be seen again. 😢😢

  • Great Expectations by Charles Dickens. Published by Babylit. Story retold by Stephanie Clarkson. Art by Mike Byrne.
  • Charles Dickens born 7th February 1812.

In Great Expectations: A BabyLit Storybook, preschoolers follow Pip’s story, learning about the value of family and friends, fortune and loss, and love. Easy-to-follow, engaging text combined with original quotes and beautiful artwork create a book to be treasured through childhood and beyond.

BabyLit(R) primers have become the chic, smart way to introduce babies to the most beloved and readable literature of our time. Gibbs Smith is now presenting a delightful collection of picture books, lovingly designed and crafted for young children. Each book retells a story from the literary canon, bringing a classic to life for an entirely new audience. 

Stephanie Clarkson began her writing career as a journalist at Britain’s Daily Mail newspaper and continues to write for the British press while dreaming up stories for children. Steph has written everything from pocket money books to gift titles and is the author of Sleeping Cinderella and Other Princess Mix-ups. She lives in Surrey, England.

Mike Byrne lives in the Surrey countryside with his wife, cat, and two young sons where he spends his days doodling and illustrating children’s books fuelled only by tea and biscuits. Mike is the illustrator of Sproutzilla vs. Christmas and My Colourful Chameleon.

Another Baby Lit book purchased this month. I want to make it known that I’m not sponsored by this company, I just think they are bloody fantastic. Great Expectations satisfied Edie’s macabre little mind….an old lady, jilted at the altar who never takes off her wedding dress! Miss Havisham was really the only part of the book that really captured her imagination. The rest of our reading session was punctuated with “who mummy?” “Why mummy?” “Why is he called Pit mummy” which basically made me want to give up. Maybe Dickens is a step too far for a 5 year old but I will persevere and in the mean time it looks great on my book shelf.

  • Then again maybe I won’t by Judy Blume.
  • Judy Blume born 12th July 1938.

Tony Miglione is thirteen, and his family lives in a cramped house in New Jersey. But then his Dad invents something that makes them rich, and they move to a luxury home in Long Island. But being rich brings it’s own problems – Tony’s Grandma feels useless when she doesn’t have to cook any more, and his mum is obsessed with impressing the neighbours, but Tony knows the boy next door isn’t as perfect as he looks. The only upside to his new life is that his neighbour Lisa keeps undressing with the light on. As he tries to adjust to his new life Tony starts to suffer from anxiety attacks and wishes everything would just be normal again.

Then Again, Maybe I Won’t is a classic coming of age story from the boy’s perspective, from Judy Blume, the author of Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret.

Oh Judy, Judy, Judy. My first sex education teacher. The woman who taught my 11 year old friends and myself about wet dreams, hard ons, boobs, periods and …..RAPLH!!!! I remember break times at school with my friends, hiding under the stairs with a copy of BIG magazine, Just Seventeen and Forever. It was lucky one of us had an older sister so we could steal these epic bibles of sex education. I remember feeling scared, intrigued, disgusted and clueless. So clueless in fact, that when the tampon lady came to give us the talk I spent at least two occasions walking around with the tampon AND the cardboard applicator inserted…..really painful! You literally couldn’t pay me to go back to those days.

Reading Judy Blume as an adult and a mother of two girls stirs up as much emotion as was contained in my 13 year old self. Different though. It makes me appreciate the stress my parents must have gone through with me as a teenager. I was a bloody nightmare. Boys, boys, alcohol, boys. My 5 year old daughter is already chatting about boys. I think as punishment for my teenage years, I am destined to have a boy mad daughter….I just thought it would start later than 5!

I guess having read this book as a mother, and having wisdom and age on my side (😳), I can take some comfort in knowing that everything will be alright (touch wood). You can’t stop kids being interested in sex etc and neither should you. Hopefully, if you bring up your kids well, they will always have some kind of moral compass and not go too far off the rails. In this book, Tony is a great kid. Sure he spies on the next door neighbours daughter and raids the drinks cabinet but on the whole, he comes off a lot better than his incredibly annoying mother. Having listened to this on audio I think I hated Mrs Miglione ten times more because of the reader’s screechy, high and slightly hoarse voice he used for all the women in the book. Mrs Miglione comes off as a weak, social climber, desperate to keep up with the Joneses. I was impressed how money didn’t change Tony. He had a strong sense of fairness and what is right and wrong. As teenagers go, I think he is pretty special.

I am left pondering what teenage boys today would think about this book. As a mother of 5 and 3 year old daughters, I have no contact with teenagers. Would today’s teens would find Judy Blume a little dull??Due to social media, you tube, tv, computer games etc, I think kids grow up quicker now and are less shockable. I can’t imagine the teenage girls I pass on the school run, reading Forever under the stairs in lunch break.

    A Series of Unfortunate Events. The Bad Beginning. By Lemony Snicket.
  • Lemony Snicket/Daniel Handler born 28th February 1970.

Dear reader,

There is nothing to be found in Lemony Snicket’s ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events’ but misery and despair. You still have time to choose another international best-selling series to read. But if you insist on discovering the unpleasant adventures of the Baudelaire orphans, then proceed with caution…

Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire are intelligent children. They are charming, and resourceful, and have pleasant facial features. Unfortunately, they are exceptionally unlucky.

In The Bad Beginning, the siblings encounter a greedy and repulsive villain, itchy clothing, a disastrous fire, a plot to steal their fortune and cold porridge for breakfast.

In the tradition of great storytellers, from Dickens to Dahl, comes an exquisitely dark comedy that is both literary and irreverent, hilarious and deftly crafted.

Despite their wretched contents, ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events’ has sold 60 million copies worldwide and been made into a Hollywood film starring Jim Carrey. And in the future things are poised to get much worse, thanks to the forthcoming Netflix series starring Neil Patrick Harris. You have been warned.

Are you unlucky enough to own all 13 adventures?

The Bad Beginning

The Reptile Room

The Wide Window

The Miserable Mill

The Austere Academy

The Ersatz Elevator

The Vile Village

The Hostile Hospital

The Carnivorous Carnival

The Slippery Slope

The Grim Grotto

The Penultimate Peril

The End

And what about All the Wrong Questions? In this four-book series a 13-year-old Lemony chronicles his dangerous and puzzling apprenticeship in a mysterious organisation that nobody knows anything about:

‘Who Could That Be at This Hour?’

‘When Did you Last See Her?’

‘Shouldn’t You Be in School?’

‘Why is This Night Different from All Other Nights?’

Lemony Snicket was born before you were and is likely to die before you as well. He was born in a small town where the inhabitants were suspicious and prone to riot. He grew up near the sea and currently lives beneath it. Until recently, he was living somewhere else.

Brett Helquist was born in Ganado, Arizona, grew up in Orem, Utah, and now lives in New York City. He earned a bachelor’s degree in fine arts from Brigham Young University and has been illustrating ever since. His art has appeared in many publications, including Cricket magazine and The New York Times.

I pretty much hate being pregnant. I am not one of those women who bloom. I am pukey, acidy and varicose veiny. I can’t believe in this day and age that no one has invented something to speed up the gestation process….I bet Violet Beaudelaire could!!! The one positive is that I give myself permission to take myself off to bed for a couple of hours (when I can) to read. Usually I am accompanied by two little people and my reading is punctuated by the whiney sound of Bing but since having kids, I have mastered the art of blocking out whining…Bing’s included. For those of you who don’t know what Bing is, it’s the most annoying kids show IN THE WORLD!!!

Last Sunday, I was lucky enough to take myself off to bed and I managed to read the whole book of Lemony Snicket. I honestly don’t think I have achieved this much since my GCSE’s.

So, Lemony Snicket….still too to old for Edie (5) but I know this is exactly the kind of book she will love. She will love the darkness of it all. Count Olaf is wickedly wicked. I adore a villain who doesn’t pretend to be anything other than a villain. I also think it makes it easier for kids to process and as a result makes it slightly less scary. The deception of a character who appears to be beautiful and kind but spends the whole time having secret, murderous thoughts is WAY more sinister. Nope, with Count Olaf what you see is what you get- from his filthy house and bad porridge all the way to his ideas of theft, treachery and under-age marriage.

Moving on to the brilliant Beaudelaire’s. These kids don’t whine….and to be fair they have ample reason for a good whinge. But no, when faced with lumpy beds, bad porridge and under-age marriage, they don’t moan, they plot! Love it. I have a particular soft spot for Violet the plucky inventor….great role model for girls.

As you can probably tell from my inane rambling, I am not a woman who loves an unreliable narrator. This is why this book is such a hit for me. There is nothing unreliable about these books or the characters. We are told right from the start that we will be faced with misery and despair and I applaud Handler’s honesty. Top work!

Anyway that is all from me this month. Hope you enjoy the start of Spring!!!! X

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s