September reads

Hi all and Happy Autumn. I for one am pleased that Summer is coming to an end. I love shorter days and longer nights…perfect for curling up with a good book.

1. Kindred by Octavia Butler. 5⭐️.

  • Description: slavery, gender issues, time travel.

In 1976, Dana dreams of being a writer. In 1815, she is assumed a slave.

When Dana first meets Rufus on a Maryland plantation, he’s drowning. She saves his life – and it will happen again and again.

Neither of them understands his power to summon her whenever his life is threatened, nor the significance of the ties that bind them.

And each time Dana saves him, the more aware she is that her own life might be over before it’s even begun.

It is a rare thing that I give a book 5⭐️ but I was completely blown away by Kindred. It had been on my Book shelf for absolutely ages and I admit I was a little put off at the prospect of reading another book about slavery. I was wrong. Octavia Butler’s book is unlike any I have ever read before. The fact that the the story is told from the point of view of Dana, a modern woman who goes back in time to the antebellum south makes it so very powerful. Slavery, when witnessed through Dana’s eyes is somehow so much more brutal and upsetting. It is honestly the most powerful description of slavery that I have ever read. The fact that the novel is often classified as science fiction initially put me off somewhat. Slavery and Science fiction???? Weird mix. For me, this novel is historical fiction. The aspect of time travel, is really not a big deal and is only used as a means to get Dana back to Maryland in the 1800s. Butler is so clever. In the present day, Dana (a black woman) is married to a white man. Back in Maryland this would obviously be completely unheard of. This idea of gender and identity really interested me. The novel was published in 1979 and it doesn’t seem to have aged at all. If you are interested in American History this is a book that should definitely be read and is one I will be recommending to everyone.

I have a book addiction which I’m sure many of you understand. My issue is that my husband thinks that the books on the shelves are the only books I own. He doesn’t realise that they are spilling out of all the drawers and in the cupboards. I pretty much buy books constantly. There are two issues with this. 1. Storage. 2. I only ever read my recent purchases. I have books on my shelves that have been there for proper yonks. This is going to stop! 🛑 ✋. From now on, each month I am going to read books written by authors who have their birthdays or deaths that month. 🎉🍰 .Birthday reads. Death reads.

2. The Brutal Art by Jesse Kellerman. 4⭐️.

  • Jesse Kellerman born 1st September.
  • Description: family ties, mystery, art.

Ethan Muller is struggling to establish his reputation as a dealer in the cut-throat world of contemporary art when he is alerted to a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity: in a decaying New York slum, an elderly tenant has disappeared, leaving behind a staggeringly large trove of original drawings and paintings. Nobody can tell Ethan much about the old man, except that he came and went in solitude for nearly forty years, his genius hidden and unacknowledged. Despite the fact that, strictly speaking, the artwork doesn’t belong to him, Ethan takes the challenge and makes a name for the old man – and himself. Soon Ethan has to congratulate himself on his own genius: for storytelling and salesmanship. But suddenly the police are interested in talking to him. It seems that the missing artist had a nasty past, and the drawings hanging in the Muller Gallery have begun to look a lot less like art and a lot more like evidence. Sucked into an investigation four decades cold, Ethan will uncover a secret legacy of shame and death, one that will touch horrifyingly close to home – and leave him fearing for his own life.

Well I am clearly sitting on a gold mine. This book has been on my shelf for 10 years. Thanks to Birthday reads, I finally took it down and I am so pleased I did. I really enjoyed it. This is almost a bit of a family saga which is great as Kellerman is able to create characters you care about and are really intrigued by. Initially I thought the protagonist was quite unlikeable but he really grew on me. The novel also centred around the Modern Art industry. Something I know nothing about but found really interesting. Some of Kellerman’s descriptions of pieces of art were really quite funny. I have included Deathbucks because it made me laugh. Happy Birthday Jesse Kellerman. Sorry I neglected you for so long.

I will definitely be reading more of you.

3. Deception by Roald Dahl. 4⭐️

  • Roald Dahl born 13th September.
  • Description: short stories, sinister, utterly varied subject matter.

‘The cruelest lies are often told in silence . . .’

Why do we lie? Why do we deceive those we love most? What do we fear revealing? In these ten tales of deception master storyteller Roald Dahl explores our tireless efforts to hide the truth about ourselves.

Here, among many others, you’ll read about how to get away with the perfect murder, the old man whose wagers end in a most disturbing payment, how revenge is sweeter when it is carried out by someone else and the card sharp so good at cheating he does something surprising with his life.

Happy Birthday to the total legend that is Roald Dahl. I adored his books as a child and now I am lucky enough to be reading his stories to Edie who thinks they are amazing. They don’t seem in any way dated. In the last couple of months I have also read 2 of his short story collections. If you are ever in a reading slump, reach for a collection of short stories. Kiss Kiss and Deception were utterly brilliant. Dahl’s imagination is genius and his range of topics is MASSIVE. I have added a couple of snippets from Deception. One is a quick one liner about the rich and the weather and the other about facial hair. Anyway Mr Dahl, Happy Birthday. I will be raising a glass to you tonight.

4. Conversations with Friends by Sally Rooney 4⭐️.

  • Description: affair, arts world, friendship.

WINNER OF THE SUNDAY TIMES / PFD YOUNG WRITER OF THE YEAR
SHORTLISTED FOR THE DYLAN THOMAS PRIZE 2018
SHORTLISTED FOR THE KERRY GROUP IRISH NOVEL OF THE YEAR 2018
SHORTLISTED FOR THE DESMOND ELLIOT PRIZE 2018
SHORTLISTED FOR THE RATHBONES FOLIO PRIZE 2018
A SUNDAY TIMES, OBSERVER AND TELEGRAPH BOOK OF THE YEAR

Frances is twenty-one years old, cool-headed and observant. A student in Dublin and an aspiring writer, at night she performs spoken word with her best friend Bobbi, who used to be her girlfriend. When they are interviewed and then befriended by Melissa, a well-known journalist who is married to Nick, an actor, they enter a world of beautiful houses, raucous dinner parties and holidays in Provence, beginning a complex ménage-à-quatre. But when Frances and Nick get unexpectedly closer, the sharply witty and emotion-averse Frances is forced to honestly confront her own vulnerabilities for the first time.

This book took me about 75 pages to get into but now it is finished I genuinely feel like I am saying goodbye to a friend. Ok, so it’s not a book for those with high moral standing, it’s not a book with particularly likeable characters but it is a little like sitting in a coffee shop and eavesdropping on a really interesting conversation. Initially, I was frustrated with Rooney’s complete disregard of speech marks but actually I think it creates a much more intimate way of writing. Definitely give it a read if you like relationships that are a little bit messy and people who are a little bit complicated. Aren’t we all?!?!?

5. The Dinner by Herman Koch. 3.5⭐️

  • Herman Koch born 5th September .
  • Description: pretentious restaurant, protecting your child, violence.

The Dinner by Herman Koch. Born September 5th in the Netherlands. This book was a solid 3.5 stars from me. I have read reviews calling it the European Gone Girl or a ‘not as good’ We Need To Talk About Kevin. This must be sooooooo annoying as an author. Just because there is an unreliable narrator and a child who commits a crime, comparisons are made when a book is not really that comparable. This is a really well written book with a brilliant and original idea. The whole novel takes place during the course of a dinner in a massively pretentious restaurant. Koch immediately had me on side because he made me laugh. The descriptions of the affected waiter pointing with his ‘pinkie’, the minuscule portion sizes and ridiculous ingredients were absolutely brilliant and incredible well observed. The fact that Koch uses the meal and arrival of each course to interrupt the drama of the story and the characters was a really interesting and original idea. I don’t want to say much about the plot to avoid spoilers. Descriptions of violent acts were pretty vivid and at times, quite hard to read. The characters were ALL unlikable. This was definitely worth a read if only for the giggles you will get about the pretentious meal. So Happy Birthday Mr Koch.

6. The Nightingale by Kristen Hannah. DNF.

  • Kristen Hannah born 25th September.

The New York Times number one bestselling title.

Bravery, courage, fear and love in a time of war.

Despite their differences, sisters Viann and Isabelle have always been close. Younger, bolder Isabelle lives in Paris while Viann is content with life in the French countryside with her husband Antoine and their daughter. But when the Second World War strikes, Antoine is sent off to fight and Viann finds herself isolated so Isabelle is sent by their father to help her.

As the war progresses, the sisters’ relationship and strength is tested. With life changing in unbelievably horrific ways, Viann and Isabelle will find themselves facing frightening situations and responding in ways they never thought possible as bravery and resistance take different forms in each of their actions.

Vivid and exquisite in its illumination of a time and place that was filled with atrocities, but also humanity and strength, Kristin Hannah’s The Nightingale will provoke thought and discussion that will have readers talking long after they finish reading.

I gave up!!!!!! This is obviously controversial as I know this is a massively popular book. I hate it when a book that loads of people love leaves me cold. I actually feel guilty. So I got to page 88 and it was fine but just a bit ‘meh.’ My main issue was Isabelle who I wanted to punch in the face and I definitely would have done if I had been Vianne. Vianne, the sister who is desperately trying to keep her daughter alive while Isabelle is being the tempestuous, volatile yet beautiful (all a little ‘characters by numbers’ for me) younger sister does all in her power to antagonise the Nazi’s. SHUT UP ISABELLE.

7. A Visit From The Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan. 3⭐️

  • Jennifer Egan born 7th September.
  • Description: 13 stories, music industry, aging, loss of innocence

This novel was the winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize. Is it a collection of short stories or a novel? Although Egan published a few as individual stories, she views the collection as a novel. Each of the 13 chapters involves interrelated stories with the majority of the characters somehow connected to the record exec Bennie Salazar. This book worked for me until about halfway through. In fact, it was the chapter Selling the General that made me lose faith. I think by then, the characters that I wanted to reappear weren’t going to and I basically stopped caring. It all became a little too random for me. I did however love this quote about being ‘real.’

Thanks for reading and I hope you all have a lovely October.

See more updates on Instagram @ellamkpbooks

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